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Glossy Black Cockatoo

 (Calyptorhynchus lathami)

Also known as: Glossy Cockatoo, Leach's Black Cockatoo, Leach's Red-tailed Cockatoo, Latham's Cockatoo, Casuarina Cockatoo

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Glossy Black Cockatoo in the wild
© aardvark | Creative Commons 2.0

Did You Know?

The Glossy Black Cockatoo has a different, more friendly personality (hand-raised birds) than its cousins the White-tailed and Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, which are more aloof.

Academic Research

Related publications: Calyptorhynchus lathami

Species Profile

Genus: Calyptorhynchus | Species: lathami

Size:

48cm (18.7 in)

Weight:

400-500g (14-17.5 oz)

Races including nominate:

three: C.l.lathami, C.l. halmaturinus, C.l. erebus

Colourization Adult:

C.l. lathami: Male-head, neck and underparts red/brown; back and wings black; centre tail feathers black, side tail feathers with red band near end. Bill grey. Eye dark brown. Female-yellow feathers on head and neck; red tail band suffused with yellow and bisected by narrow black bars. Bill grey/horn coloured.
C.l. halmaturinus: Both adults similar to lathami but bill larger.
C.l. erebus: Both adults like lathami but bill smaller.

Colourization Juvenile:

C.l. lathami: Sides of head spotted yellow and some yellow spots on upper and under wing coverts, mainly darker yellow in subadult males; lower underparts barred with soft yellow, more evident in subadult females; tail band like that of adult female, but darker red in subadult males. Bill horn coloured washed with grey at base.
C.l. halmaturinus: Like lathami, but bill larger.
C.l. erebus: Like lathami, but bill smaller.

Call:

Call soft wailing or wheezing sound. Gutteral alarm call. Female soliciting food from male emits squeaking sound.

Listen Now

Video Links:

Video 1 | Video 2 | Video 3

More Information:

National Parks of New South Wales
AvianWeb
Glossy Black Cockatoo Conservancy

South Australian subspecies of the Glossy Black Cockatoo Recovery Plan

Content Sources:

Bird Care
CITES
BirdLife International
Internet Bird Collection
Parrots: A Guide to Parrots of the World, Juniper and Parr, 1998
Parrots: Status Survey and Conservation Plan 2000-2004, Snyder, McGowan, Gilardi and Grajal, 2000.
Parrots of the World, Forshaw and Cooper, 1977. 2010 edition
Parrots of the World, Forshaw, 2006.
Parrots in Aviculture, Low, 1992.
Guide to Incubation and Handraising Parrots, Digney, 1998.

Click photo to visit gallery

Glossy Black Cockatoo in the wild
© aardvark | Creative Commons 2.0

Did You Know?

The Glossy Black Cockatoo has a different, more friendly personality (hand-raised birds) than its cousins the White-tailed and Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, which are more aloof.

Academic Research

Related publications: Calyptorhynchus lathami

Species Care

Captive Status:

Rare but increasing in Australia; virtually unknown elsewhere.

Longevity:

20 or more yrs.

Housing:

Walk-in enclosure, minimum length 4.5m (14.7 ft).

Diet:

Casuarina seeds, if available; nuts including: walnuts, almonds and pine nuts; sunflower seed, wheat, maize and fresh corn; green leaves like lettuce and Swiss chard if taken; oranges may be offered. Complete kibble.

Enrichment:

Chewables, such as bird-safe wood (fir, pine, bamboo), wood block toys, vegetable tanned leather toys and heat sterilized pine cones.

Nest Box Size:

Nest log

Clutch Size:

1

Incubation Time:

28-29 days

Fledging Age:

3 months

Hatch Weight:

15g (0.5 oz)

Peak Weight:

Around 370g (13 oz)

Weaning Weight:

340-350g (12-12.25 oz)

Click photo to visit gallery

Glossy Black Cockatoo in the wild
© aardvark | Creative Commons 2.0

Did You Know?

The Glossy Black Cockatoo has a different, more friendly personality (hand-raised birds) than its cousins the White-tailed and Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, which are more aloof.

Academic Research

Related publications: Calyptorhynchus lathami

Species Wild Status

World Population:

Around 17,000

IUCN Red List Status:

Least Concern, however, erebus numbers only around 5000 individuals and halmaturinus has only 70 breeding pairs and is restricted to Kangaroo Island.

CITES Listing:

Appendix II

Threat Summary:

Habitat loss, trapping for wild bird trade, habitat degradation and fragmentation.

Range:

C.l. lathami: E Australia from lat. 26S in SW Queensland south to E Victoria.
C.l. halmaturinus: Restricted to Kangaroo Island, S Australia. Formerly in Mount Lofty.
C.l. erebus: CE Queensland, in Dawson-Mackenzie-Isaac Rivers basin, and possibly west of Paluma Range in NE Queensland.

Habitat:

Found around Casuarina or Allocasuarina trees. Also prefers Eucalyptus woodland in high ranges. Occurs in riverine woodland, dense forest, semi-arid woods, coastal forest, wet and dry sclerophyll forest and brigalow scrub.

Wild Diet:

Specializes on Casuarina and Allocasuarina, taking the cones from each. Also noted taking fruit, wood-boring grubs, sunflower Helianthus seeds, Acacia, Banksia and Eucalypt seeds.

Ecology and Behaviour:

Resident, but may move locally after breeding. Found in small, quiet groups of up to 20 birds but usually in smaller parties of 2 to 10. Often found in groups of two adults and one immature. Will congregate to feed. Not found in large flocks in open areas. Pair bond is strong.

Clutch and Egg Size:

1 ovate egg, 44.5 x 33.5mm (1.7 x 1.3 in).

Breeding Season:

March-August

Related Links:

Wikipedia
Birds in Backyards
NSW Government Department of Environment and Conservation
Article "Nesting habitat of the Glossy Black Cockatoo in central New South Wales", by Matt Cameron, ScienceDirect.com

Click photo to visit gallery

Glossy Black Cockatoo in the wild
© aardvark | Creative Commons 2.0

Did You Know?

The Glossy Black Cockatoo has a different, more friendly personality (hand-raised birds) than its cousins the White-tailed and Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, which are more aloof.

Academic Research

Related publications: Calyptorhynchus lathami

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