Towel Phobia & Cage Bonded
Posted: 03 February 2008 11:47 PM   [ Ignore ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

Because I had to medicate my new 5-month old SI Eclectus 4 weeks after I brought him home he is now terrified of towels.  I only toweled him about 4 times before I resorted to lacing cornbread with his medication.  This was the period of time we were supposed to bond, but I unknowingly brought home a sick bird.  He is recovered.  Also, Immediately upon bringing him home he bonded to his cage.  He will not stay with me for more than a couple of seconds before he turns and goes back onto his cage (he has always been like this)  He is now 7 months and is still bonded to his cage.  I have taken him on outings to socialize, but this hasn’t helped.  He eats his favorite snack on the sofa with me then when he is done he trembles and flys back to his cage.  Will this ever pass?  He’s not into people.  He is happy with and in his cage, very playful now that he is well.  He’s also beginning to talk.  So, it seems like he’s happy, but I’m not so happy having a stand-offish bird.  Any suggestions?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 February 2008 11:49 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2008-02-09

hello,, I have the oppsite problem, My sunconure loves to be with me all the time, She lives on my shoulder, When ever i try to put her in her cage , she will scream. as soon as it gets dark she will duck into my shirt to avoid going in her cage. I sometimes wish she loves her cage more as it leaves me with yuky poop on my shoulders, & a spoiled bird. I would try daily outing with out the cage in sight, put in another room where it out of sight & just realx with her . mine won’t let anyone near me without screaming, trying to protect me i guess it’s a bonding thing. keep trying & good luck .

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 February 2008 12:46 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
Active Participant
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  138
Joined  2007-05-28

dear k.miller,

it sounds as if your parrot was either rushed through the growing and weaning process with a loss of self secure feelings or else it was perhaps a single bird kept alone by itself as a baby. as ecletus parrots can be by nature a bit stand-offish and are certainly not always the touch and pet kind of parrots, then it will take some time for your bird to begin growing confident enough to be away from its cage a longer time. I would suggest getting a smaller cage about like a carry cage and letting your parrot get used to that.  Then taking the bird on outings inside that cage and getting it used to being in safe and different situations. some eclectus like to hide in green branches rather than being exposed to open sky when they are out. we have even taught some of our more timid pet parrots to sleep in a carry cage beside our bed so that they may be encouraged with soft talk or a little foot touch or the like during the night. then they can come out onto the bed to socialise in the morning and just before we go to sleep. it is a very calm scene where the parrot learns to be away from its cage but nearby. calmness and nervous eclectus parrots go together well! remember that at age 7 months (28 weeks) your male is very much the baby bird. especially if he has had a medical problem and was given special care for it. he will certainly be able to grow and get more confident (does he fly?) since he is still so young, but it may take some months and the important thing is to NOT PUSH him so that he stays nervous and does not get better. hopefully you are not feeding him a dry diet like seeds or all pellets because eclectus are not happy unless they have cooked, soft, sprouted, raw and fresh foods.

as for that towel thing. try getting a big bright bath towel like phoebe linden uses. make it one that looks nothing like the ones he was held in to medicate him (if they were bright, then choose a somber green or beige one, etc).  use the new towel to cover part of his cage at night or other times, make it a spread towel to eat treats on and even walk and play on and after he gets used to it, then it will be HIS towel.  do not wrap him in it because that will cause more fear of being restrained. good luck.
cool smile

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 February 2008 02:55 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

Thank you for your reply.  I did remove his cage from the room and hid it outside on the balcony and closed the blinds.  I did it a few times.  It didn’t change anything.  He got me back for doing it.  While he was admiring the view from atop his cage and I admire him from beside his cage when he rushed over to me.  I thought he was rushing over to give me a kiss, so I puckered up.  He have me a nip instead.  It was for taking his cage away from him.  Since it didn’t change anything, I stopped removing his cage.  As long as there is somewhere for him to perch in the room he would prefer to perch on an object rather than stay with me.  He is starting to warm up a little.  When I recline in my chair which is close to his cage he will step onto my hand, but if I take him too many inches away from his cage even while seated next to his cage he gets into a little fit of anxiety (I’ve checked my breath and that’s not it).  To show him he can trust me, I move my hand back over to the cage.  Something in his personality and the way he was raised has caused this anxiety.  I believe he was too sheltered during his baby days.

I wouldn’t want your problem, either.  My last boy was a perfect balance of independent and loving.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 February 2008 03:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

Dear Yellowfronts,

Thank you for taking the time to reply.  I appreciate your comments.  I wasn’t allowed to see for myself where he was raised and how the babies are raised.  I do know he was raised with several other babies.  I was told that the babies are kept in a dark and covered box until they are ready to come out, replicating the experience wild babies would have.  My first SI was raised the opposite, and he was the most well adjusted bird I’d ever met.  Even his vet said he was the “coolest”, best bird he’d ever met.  I know my baby’s breeder has the best intentions.  He does get 2 warm meals a day, all homemade from homemade soak mix as well as Leach’s soak mix with peas, organic fruits and vegetables, and seed in the afternoon with a couple of Harrisons pellets.  He does have a small sleeping cage beside my bed.  I like your idea of getting a bright towel and covering his cage with it to get him used to towels again.  I do cover it with a brightly colored table cloth.  He still trembles when I put him in the sleeping cage, but goes in easily.  He will not play on the bed, or the floor.  He only anxiously looks up to the free standing perch in the room.  He walks to the edge of the bed and wants to get off and onto the perch.  He can fly, but doesn’t unless I toss him up, then he happily flys to his cage, or if I walk away with him he’ll fly back to his cage.  I’m hoping in time I can put a harness on him so he can go outside with me to the Farmer’s Market.  Putting a harness on him at this point will only make him less trusting.  It’s odd that when someone holds him he turns his head and looks behind him rather than at the person talkiing to him.  What’s with that???

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2008 05:26 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]
New Participant
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2007-08-27

Miller,

One other thing you may also want to try is delivering her back to her cage yourself. You can see she already acts insecure and is seeking the security of her cage, why not try delivering her back to her cage so she begins to associate you with a sense of securtiy? This may allow for her trust in you to build again. I agree with what the previous poster has said in not pushing her. I don’t think you are but if you do it will make your bonding process all the harder and longer.

I have an eclectus hen whom I had to medicate also. Ever since I did, she is hesitant in stepping up for me. The process of her building trust in me again has been a long and steady one, but we are getting there.

 Signature 

Lara

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2008 10:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

Dear Lara,

Thanks for your thoughtful response.  As long as I keep moving he doesn’t fly back to his cage.  He flys back to his cage if I stand with him a couple of feet from the cage, or if I sit down on the sofa, which is about 6 feet from his cage.  I medicated him in the kitchen, so now when his food is ready I take him to the kitchen to get his food dish and bring it and him right back to his cage.  I’m not pushing him.  I think that would be a mistake.  He steps up, visits face to face with me for a bout 4 seconds and wants to go back in or on his cage.  He talks and is pleasantly vocal, so it seems he’s happy.  I think growing up he didn’t see a sofa, TV, or other types of furniture and all this scares him.  I wish he would have been exposed to more and socialized more as a youngling.  It would have made this transition easier on him.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 26 February 2008 01:38 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]
New Participant
Avatar
Rank
Total Posts:  14
Joined  2007-08-27

Miller,
Your observations of your bird’s behavior and his surroundings, in my opinion, are a sign of great bird owner and a great future together.

Have you tried working with your bird on calling him to you while you are sitting on the couch or different areas of his sight?

 Signature 

Lara

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 February 2008 11:05 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

Dear Lara,
I’ll take that as a compliment…thank you.  There are only 2 ocassions he will fly to me: 1) while eating my dinner he has flown to me, at which time I do not acknowledge his action and take him back to his cage; and 2) when I’m making his dinner I stand a couple of feet from his flying perch (a bouncy perch) attached to the outside of his cage in the direction of the kitchen, he will on occassion fly to me when I hold out my hand for him in which case he gets his favorite treat as a reward.  I put a brightly colored beach towel over his cage last night and this morning I took it off then folded it so it would be a pad atop his cage.  I was hoping he would play with his foot toys on it like he has started doing with the tablecloth cover I’ve been using.  He was too scared to get near the folded towel.  I don’t want to cause irreversible damage so I don’t know if I should continue to use the towel to cover the cage.  I would think that eventually he would become desensitized to it.  What do you think?  And to answer your question, at this point he would not fly to me while I’m seated on the sofa or anywhere else.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 February 2008 11:11 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]
Active Participant
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  138
Joined  2007-05-28

Eat your dinner on the sofa sometimes; eclectus love people food. Our friends eclectus has his own perch at the table for lunch.

Use the table cloth cover to cover his cage. If he gets used to it, buy another one just like it for him. cool smile

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 September 2008 10:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]
Active Participant
Avatar
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  56
Joined  2007-06-10

Sassy,  sounds like you do, indeed, have a spoiled bird on your hand.  I have a sun/jenday hybrid conure that is also strong-willed.  He used to be tolerable until I allowed him to bond to a green cheeked conure and set up house with him.  Now, if I try to take the little green cheeked out (who happens to be very lovable), I get bit if the hybrid can get to me quick enough.  So it’s basically a juggling act now. I usually wait until they’re on the manzanita tree and far enough apart before I pick up the little green cheek.      Cindi

sassy - 24 February 2008 11:49 AM

hello,, I have the oppsite problem, My sunconure loves to be with me all the time, She lives on my shoulder, When ever i try to put her in her cage , she will scream. as soon as it gets dark she will duck into my shirt to avoid going in her cage. I sometimes wish she loves her cage more as it leaves me with yuky poop on my shoulders, & a spoiled bird. I would try daily outing with out the cage in sight, put in another room where it out of sight & just realx with her . mine won’t let anyone near me without screaming, trying to protect me i guess it’s a bonding thing. keep trying & good luck .

 Signature 

Cindi Eppers

Profile
 
 
Posted: 23 September 2008 10:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  12
Joined  2007-12-04

I didn’t realize I hadn’t updated my post.  In April I had my Eclectus, Lexi, tested for diseases as I wanted to get him vaccinated.  He tested positive for PBFD.  He came to me with this disease.  He was loosing feathers in the first 2 weeks that I had him.  The stress of the adjustment obviously triggered the virus.  He wasn’t handled properly by the breeder and feeders.  He was hurried in his feeding, as evidenced by the chronic aspiration pneumonia he was diagnosed with 4 weeks after I took possession of him.  He wasn’t acting right because he didn’t feel right.  Poor thing.  Recently there have been 4 known babies that came from Eclectusville that have been diagnosed with PBFD.  Me and another girl are the only ones that don’t have other birds in the home for the breeder to blame it on, however, she still denies her aviary and/or the aviary she brokers for has a problem with PBFD.  She continues to sell babies.  This is criminal.  Lexi is now 16 months old and bald on his body and head.  Only his wings have feathers and he still has a few tail feathers left.  I don’t force him to do anything.  I care for him holistically and he’s doing much better than the others are/have, living and deceased.  I hope no one else has to go through this.  This, however, explains a lot about how he acted when I got him - depressed, fearful, etc.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 05 January 2009 06:22 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]
New Participant
Rank
Total Posts:  4
Joined  2009-01-05
k.miller - 23 September 2008 10:59 PM

I didn’t realize I hadn’t updated my post.  In April I had my Eclectus, Lexi, tested for diseases as I wanted to get him vaccinated.  He tested positive for PBFD.  He came to me with this disease.  He was loosing feathers in the first 2 weeks that I had him.  The stress of the adjustment obviously triggered the virus.  He wasn’t handled properly by the breeder and feeders.  He was hurried in his feeding, as evidenced by the chronic aspiration pneumonia he was diagnosed with 4 weeks after I took possession of him.  He wasn’t acting right because he didn’t feel right.  Poor thing.  Recently there have been 4 known babies that came from Eclectusville that have been diagnosed with PBFD.  Me and another girl are the only ones that don’t have other birds in the home for the breeder to blame it on, however, she still denies her aviary and/or the aviary she brokers for has a problem with PBFD.  She continues to sell babies.  This is criminal.  Lexi is now 16 months old and bald on his body and head.  Only his wings have feathers and he still has a few tail feathers left.  I don’t force him to do anything.  I care for him holistically and he’s doing much better than the others are/have, living and deceased.  I hope no one else has to go through this.  This, however, explains a lot about how he acted when I got him - depressed, fearful, etc.

Very sad sorry indeed, the breeder should be shot!

 Signature 

Info on African Grey Parrots

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ what can your parrot say?      plucking ››