Flicking of my ecluectus wings
Posted: 01 December 2009 02:35 PM   [ Ignore ]
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I have a 2 year old female Solomon Islands Ecluectus that when she is sitting in her cage she will flick one wing and then the other within a few seconds. This will go on for some time. I am wondering if anyone has seen this and if there anything I need to worry about. She has veggies in the morning and aftrnoon. Noon she gets some fruit. Also pellets for ecluectus and a small amount of seeds. Can she be Ill of is this a bad habit? Please someone give me your thoughts. Thanks
John

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Posted: 02 December 2009 03:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Does the bird over groom or mutilate feathers? What kind of pellets?

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Posted: 03 December 2009 02:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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She does not mutilate feathers but she does seem to overgroom a little. She hangs on the side of the cage and goes at it with a way that seems a bit agressive. She eats Pretty Bird Species Specific for Ecluectus. Thanks.

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Posted: 19 December 2009 03:25 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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We used to feed pretty bird in the past. We would not do so any more.

Eclectus do best on soft food and sprouts and cooked rice and beans and lentils and buckwheat and the like. Plenty of fruit with the seeds intact. Lots of fresh veggies and corn on the cob. Even soft safe foods that people are eating for meals. Even softbill or lory type feeding is good for eclectus. Ours used to love smoothies!

Eclectus have been known to start plucking or shaving feathers when they are forced to eat dry foods like pellets and seeds. They will often dunk them into a water bowl to try and make them palatable. Also, colored pellets are worse than the plain brown ones without dyes. It is a misconception to believe that any dry extruded diet is in fact “species specific.” Look at the main ingredients for the bags of “grey mix”, “amazon mix”, “macaw mix” and note how similar are the ingredients even though the parrots are feeding totally different in the wilds. Such bags of food tend to be a buyer-oriented marketing ploy, not a decades-long scientific study based on wild parrot food consumption facts. 

Females will often begin shaving feathers if they have a nesting site picked out in the home somewhere. If she is aggressively going after her plumage, it could indicate dry skin or allergies. Avoid food materials that contain cheap mass produced commercial corn or wheat.  cool smile

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