rescue macaw
Posted: 07 June 2010 08:50 PM   [ Ignore ]
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Hi my name is kevin and im new to this forum.Ok here is my story.A guy i work with has a macaw that hes had for 26 years.He has become verry ill and can no longer look after his bird.The bird is starting to pluck because the owner can no longer spend time with her.I have a african grey that ive had for 31 years so i have some experience with parrots.Today was his last day of work because of his ilness and he asked me if i would adopt her so if something happens she wouldnt go to the pound.I have done some reasearch on them and i do understand that they can be loud and need afection and keept amused with toys.I have decided that i will adopt her but i want to make it as stress free as possible.I was thinking of going over a half hr everyday for 2 weeks before i move her.Is there any other suggestion you have that i can do?Also is there anything i should know about them im not thinking of?thanks for your time….kevin

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Posted: 10 June 2010 11:51 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]
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Dear Kevin,
I am forwarding a response by Phoebe Linden.
All best,
Cristiana

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Hi Kevin,
Thanks a lot for joining the discussion forum at WPT and for introducing us to your new macaw friend.
First, congratulations on adopting a parrot who needs a home—that’s a wonderful thing to do for both you and the macaw.
Next, I like your idea of going over to the macaw’s existing home and visiting her so that she becomes accustomed to you. You will get a good idea of how she responds to her current caregiver and you during those visits. Be sure to take her favorite treats, probably nuts, and use them to charm her. Don’t be surprised if everyone decides that two weeks of visits are too much—together, you may decide to move her to new surroundings as soon as everyone is ready.
Speaking of surroundings, the environments you’ll provide are key to everyone’s future happiness and success. It’s terrific that you have experience with your grey who will also be part of the transition team, and who also might want some new stuff, but be prepared to scale everything up in size for the macaw, including perches, (her feet are sooo much bigger) bowls, (she won’t be able to get that huge beak inside a little bowl) cages, (one for day, one for night, perhaps?) play areas (she’ll cover more ground than your grey does.) and your time.
Transition is greatly eased when there are plenty of places where parrots can hang out, goof off, eat, nap, sleep and watch each other. It’s not a matter of 1 + 1 = 2! Once your new macaw comes home, it will be more like 1 + 1 = 4! I’m so glad you’re getting prepared! The more space you can design and equip to give her safe choices while active, and secure rest when tired, the better everyone’s lives will be. Think like a macaw—really look at the places she’ll go in your house and see them from her point of view, then make adjustments.
So, think of creating environments that you 3 will share. Keep everything flexible because you’ll notice that adjustments need to be made, so keep watching and tweaking spaces as needed.
During your observations of her, you’ll notice what she likes to touch with her beak. Pay special attention to objects, materials and toys that she likes to “preen” (like rattan, grape vines and palm fronds) or tasks she stays with for a good amount of time (like getting nuts out of their shells or throwing toys out of a basket) because these are what you’ll use in abundance to give her alternatives to feather destruction. These enrichments plus time out of the cage will go a long way to giving her outlets for nervous and/or repetitive behaviors.
Be sure to have nuts on hand, too—walnuts and almonds especially. You may have to crack them for her until she learns how to do it. You’ll both be learners during this process!
All the best, Kevin. Be sure to write WPT again if more questions arise.
Phoebe Greene Linden

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Cristiana Senni
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Posted: 18 June 2010 08:17 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]
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Ok ive had my new rescue for about 5 days now.For the last 2 days she wont listen to up or down comands and just wants to stay on her cage.I read that she might be testing us to try and be the head bird and to just keep making her do what we want.Then i saw a video on training macaws and he said to let them make up there own mind.Any suggestions?Also today i bought her a new bigger cage and wanted to know how i should fase her to use the new cage?I was going to put them sideby side and use a perch to attach them together then start putting all her fav foods in the new one then eventualy remove the old one.The thing is when she is on the old one she plays with her toys and is quiet most of the day as soon as i put her on her new giant perch she screams non stop.Im thinking that the old cage is all she has left of her old life….thanks again for all your help…kevin

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Posted: 18 June 2010 09:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]
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Hi Kevin,

Thanks for the follow up note. Regarding your questions, you might want to check out some of the resources in the WPT reference library - http://www.parrots.org/index.php/referencelibrary/behaviourandenviroenrich/.

I’d suggest reading the article by Steve Martin titled ‘Does your Parrot have a Trust account?’ and then pretty much any of the other articles on the page. They have a ton of really great information written by the world’s foremost experts on parrot training and behaviour.

Hope this is helpful.

Steve-

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Steve Milpacher
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World Parrot Trust

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Posted: 18 June 2010 09:50 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]
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thanks for the link .thats what i was looking for…kevin

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